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Slavery and Freedom on the Periphery: Faunal Analysis of Four Ante- and Post-bellum Maryland Sites

Author(s): Mia L Carey

Year: 2015

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Summary

Vertebrate faunal remains recovered from four Maryland cultural resource management projects provide a unique opportunity to explore the dietary patterns of formerly enslaved and free African Americans in the late-18th to early-20th centuries. Maryland straddled the border between a slave based, plantation economy and a free labor economy, allowing its African American communities more opportunities to gain their freedom and earn a living.  Faunal assemblages were analyzed and compared to assess consumption practies over the span of the 19th century. Though the samples are relatively small, preliminary results indicate that the data closely resembles other faunal assemblages in the Chesapeake region. Samples suggest a moderate reliance on large domesticates with non-commercialized secondary butchering practices. The taxa present  appear to demonstrate stable consumer choice patterns over a long time span, despite the broad and sustained cultural, social, and economic changes that occurred during this period.


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Cite this Record

Slavery and Freedom on the Periphery: Faunal Analysis of Four Ante- and Post-bellum Maryland Sites. Mia L Carey. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 434017)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
19th Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 337

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America