The Idea of the Enlightenment and Environmental Relations in Early Modern Ostrobothnian Towns of Sweden: Macro- and Microfossil Studies of Local Plant Use

Author(s): Annamari Tranberg

Year: 2016

Summary

Macro- and microfossil studies from the early modern Ostrobothnian towns provide information about both natural and cultural elements of local landscapes, including how landscapes changed in time and affected people’s lives. In this paper, I will discuss how the Ostrobothnians used their local plants. The period from the late 17th to the late 18th century was a time of significant chances in the philosophy of life and economic policy in Sweden, as well as in Europe in general. During the 18th century, mercantilism was eventually replaced by physiocratism; individuality emerged and natural sciences developed. Agriculture and forestry were believed to form the basis for increasing the net production of the nation, and different solutions were sought to increase productivity, including commercial cultivation of plants from the homeland, and to some degree, from overseas.

Cite this Record

The Idea of the Enlightenment and Environmental Relations in Early Modern Ostrobothnian Towns of Sweden: Macro- and Microfossil Studies of Local Plant Use. Annamari Tranberg. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434511)

Keywords

General
Early Modern Macrofossil Ostrobothnia

Geographic Keywords
Finland Western Europe

Temporal Keywords
Early modern

Spatial Coverage

min long: 19.648; min lat: 59.807 ; max long: 31.582; max lat: 70.089 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 620