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Time, Discipline and Punishment: Private and state capitalism in northern Sweden in the seventeenth century

Author(s): Jonas Nordin

Year: 2016

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Summary

In the seventeenth century the Danish and Swedish states strengthened their control over the northernmost areas of Fenno-Scandinavia: Sápmi. Borders were constructed, market-places founded and the Lutheran Church gained a firm foothold through mission and the founding new churches. A main force in this development was the hunger for the regions resources, such as pearls, furs, precious stones and metals.

Through landscape analysis and the study the material remains of several sites, spatial difference is acknowledged at the works sites. The implementation of structured and ordered time through the introduction of centrally placed sun dials and bells at the industrial sites, indicates the introduction of modern concepts of production and time. At these places ordered time also had new meaning since the days of summer were endless due to the midnight sun and thus revealing an hitherto unseen ambition to control the work force.


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Cite this Record

Time, Discipline and Punishment: Private and state capitalism in northern Sweden in the seventeenth century. Jonas Nordin. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434512)


Keywords

General
Colonialism industrialisation time

Geographic Keywords
Sweden Western Europe

Temporal Keywords
17th Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: 11.113; min lat: 55.34 ; max long: 24.167; max lat: 69.06 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 628

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America