Indianola, The Forgotten Gateway to Western Texas: A Proposed Plan of Archaeological Investigation, Preservation, and Outreach

Author(s): Samuel M Cuellar

Year: 2016

Summary

The port of Indianola once served as the Gulf Coast's western terminus, providing the shortest overland routes to the Pacific Coast and access to countless European and American immigrants settling west Texas. By 1871, Indianola was second only to Galveston in the size and traffic of its port. Success was short lived, however. Two successive hurricanes in 1875 and 1886 destroyed the city, causing its widescale distruction and abandonment.  Despite a rich, important history, Indianola has not been the focus of extensive archaeological investigations and little is known outside the local area of the role it played in shaping a modern western Texas. This paper presents a plan to determine the archaeological scope of the site, preservation in the shallow waters of Matagorda Bay, and how Indianola's history and the study of underwater archaeology can be disseminated to a wider public audience.

Cite this Record

Indianola, The Forgotten Gateway to Western Texas: A Proposed Plan of Archaeological Investigation, Preservation, and Outreach. Samuel M Cuellar. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434908)

Keywords

General
Indianola Port Texas

Geographic Keywords
North America United States of America

Temporal Keywords
19th Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 715