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Fears, Frontiers, and Third Spaces: Rethinking Colonial Encounters in the Early Modern British Atlantic

Author(s): Audrey Horning

Year: 2017

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Summary

The concept of the frontier is often understood to be by definition one sided- one group’s frontier is of course another’s homeland. The idea of the frontier is thus the sign of a failed imagination; a mote in the eye blocking perspective. But the notion of a frontier can also convey liminality and lawlessness, a place apart from rules and regulations, laws and orders. If there is any truth in this construction, then frontiers might also be understood as third spaces. In this paper I will consider the utility of the concept of the frontier as a third space, with a particular focus upon violence as culturally meaningful and a key element in the emergence of colonial identities in the early modern British Atlantic.


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Fears, Frontiers, and Third Spaces: Rethinking Colonial Encounters in the Early Modern British Atlantic. Audrey Horning. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435128)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -8.158; min lat: 49.955 ; max long: 1.749; max lat: 60.722 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 462

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America