Using Unmanned Aerial Systems and Historical Maps to Monitor Present and Predict Future Shoreline Impacts

Author(s): Lindsey Cochran

Year: 2019

Summary

This is an abstract from the "Case Studies from SHA’s Heritage at Risk Committee" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology.

Natural and anthropogenic climate changes, specifically from sea-level rise, are drastically reshaping coastal waterways and shorelines. Few regional predictive models capture hyper-local changes. In response, this research project combined geospatial information captured with an unmanned areial system (AUS) with georeferenced maps from 1868-2015 with DEM and LiDAR data to calculate the rate of change at high-risk areas of coastal Georgia through transect-based digital surveys. Geospatial analyses are "groundtruthed" with an AUS to: (1) test the rate at which climate changes are occurring at an increasingly rapid rate from 1860s- present; (2) calculate rate of change at site-specific scale; and (3) propose a triage system to identify, document, and mitigate at-risk cultural resources.

Cite this Record

Using Unmanned Aerial Systems and Historical Maps to Monitor Present and Predict Future Shoreline Impacts. Lindsey Cochran. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, St. Charles, MO. 2019 ( tDAR id: 448964)

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Keywords

Temporal Keywords
Modern

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 431