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Transformation and Continuity: Late Tiwanaku to Post Tiwanaku traditions in the Central Valley of Cochabamba

Author(s): Karen Anderson

Year: 2015

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Summary

This paper presents evidence from the Central Valley of Cochabamba, a key peripheral region of the Tiwanaku state. It addresses Tiwanaku expansion, state collapse and post-Tiwanaku transformation and continuity using data from ceramic styles and other material culture traditions. Also presented are new radio-carbon dates from the Central Valley site of Piñami covering Tiwanaku expansion and collapse and how these dates fit into the larger regional context and suggest that Tiwanaku influence continued longer in Cochabamba than in other areas. I then discuss the implications of this data for understanding how state collapse impacted local and regional social identities, political economy and interaction networks.

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Transformation and Continuity: Late Tiwanaku to Post Tiwanaku traditions in the Central Valley of Cochabamba. Karen Anderson. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 396876)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
South America


Spatial Coverage

min long: -93.691; min lat: -56.945 ; max long: -31.113; max lat: 18.48 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America