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Lithic production, managment and mobility strategies adaptation during the GS-1 and Early Holocene in North-Western France

Author(s): Nicolas Naudinot

Year: 2016

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Summary

The second half of the Late glacial is marked in North Western Europe by a major climatic instability with clear consequences on the vegetation and in resources density and distribution. At the end of this period, the GS-1 cooling is well recorded and is one of the most important of these events. During this period, hunter-gatherer groups experienced major changes in a large part of Europe extended from Spain to Scandinavia. This period is marked by the rapid spread of a phenomenon characterized by a massive return of blades associated with a particularly invested technology. This period is in clear rupture with the previous millennia (GIS-1) marked by the “azilianization process” of the Magdalenian societies and illustrated by a progressive reduction of technical investment in lithic productions. The development of this new lithic equipment goes with changes in mobility patterns, tool management strategies or symbolic system. Did the GS-1 cooling and the rapid Holocene warming play a role in these changes? Some of our data would suggest that it is the case. The situation is however probably much more complex and it is impossible to explain such a complicated phenomenon by a simple deterministic equation.


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Lithic production, managment and mobility strategies adaptation during the GS-1 and Early Holocene in North-Western France. Nicolas Naudinot. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 403853)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
Europe


Spatial Coverage

min long: -11.074; min lat: 37.44 ; max long: 50.098; max lat: 70.845 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America