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Making and Breaking: Domestic Craft Production, Fragmentation, and Enchainment at Classic Period Chinikihá, Mexico and Currusté, Honduras

Author(s): Jeanne Lopiparo

Year: 2016

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Summary

This paper examines the role of domestic craft production and the fragmentation and interment of locally made goods in the reproduction of social identities and networks of social relations at two Late to Terminal Classic (600-900 AD) sites, Chinikihá in the Western Maya Lowlands of Chiapas, Mexico and Currusté in the Ulúa Valley, Honduras. The life histories of the products of small-scale, household-based industries were intimately tied to the life histories of their producers, enchaining the living to the dead through mortuary practices in which fragments of those products were interred with their makers.


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Making and Breaking: Domestic Craft Production, Fragmentation, and Enchainment at Classic Period Chinikihá, Mexico and Currusté, Honduras. Jeanne Lopiparo. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 404789)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -107.271; min lat: 12.383 ; max long: -86.353; max lat: 23.08 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America