tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Evidence of diet and food consumption from Chavin de Huantar during the Middle and Late Andean Formative (1200 – 550 BCE)

Author(s): Christian Mesia ; Sadie Weber

Year: 2017

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

Excavations carried out at the Wacheqsa sector at Chavín de Huantar identified archaeological contexts from the Middle Formative (1200 – 900 cal BCE) and Late Formative (900 – 550 Cal BCE). In this paper we present preliminary results of starch analysis carried on in culinary equipment (ceramics) retrieved from domestic occupations from the Middle and Late Formative periods and a large midden, originated from the discard of feasting remains during the Late Formative period. Microbotanical analysis performed on the ceramic assemblage retrieved in these spatial units revealed a variety of plant food resources. Two types of maize, wild grasses, chili peppers, and olluco were identified. Maize was overwhelmingly the most common taxon present, and some granules exhibited signs of grinding, boiling, and possibly fermentation which could be indicative of chicha consumption within the Wacheqsa sector. This evidence may suggest patterns of consumption among the spatial units identified as well as vessel use specialization for food production, having at the same time implications in food procurement and resource management strategies.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Evidence of diet and food consumption from Chavin de Huantar during the Middle and Late Andean Formative (1200 – 550 BCE). Christian Mesia, Sadie Weber. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 429417)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -93.691; min lat: -56.945 ; max long: -31.113; max lat: 18.48 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 17209

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America