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Crowdfunding, Crowdsourcing and the Collaborative Economy: Old Wine/New Bottles, or Genuine Game Changer for Archaeology?

Author(s): Brendon Wilkins

Year: 2017

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Summary

DigVentures was launched in 2012 as a rewards-based crowdfunding platform designed to enable participation in archaeology and citizen science projects. We were formed by a small team of archaeologists, driven to action by what we saw as the three most pressing needs affecting our sector: the necessity for heritage professionals, museums and cultural organizations to reduce dependence on grants and state funding; the development of digitally enabled alternative finance models that diversify sources of funding; and the rise of the experience economy and popularity of citizen science. Our first campaign at Flag Fen stands as world’s first-ever successfully crowdfunded archaeological excavation. Since then, we’ve repeated that initial success, crowdfunding a total of £150,000 for our projects, unlocking a further £700,000 in match funding from traditional grant-givers. Set within a broader economic trend that has seen the UK alternative finance market rise to £3.2b in 2015 (up 82% from £1.7b in 2014) and this new approach clearly offers promise. Drawing from specific examples from our project portfolio, in this short presentation I will explore the potential issues and practical steps that archaeologists can take to harness the crowd, and what differentiates this new model from anything that has gone before.


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Cite this Record

Crowdfunding, Crowdsourcing and the Collaborative Economy: Old Wine/New Bottles, or Genuine Game Changer for Archaeology?. Brendon Wilkins. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 429626)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
Europe


Spatial Coverage

min long: -11.074; min lat: 37.44 ; max long: 50.098; max lat: 70.845 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 14582

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America