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A Method for Identifying Surface Scatters in the Jungles of Belize: A Case Study from the Medicinal Trail Community

Author(s): Heather McDonough ; Zachary Hall ; David M. Hyde

Year: 2017

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Summary

The implementation of systematic surface collection on a grid within Operation 17 at the Medicinal Trail Community in Northwestern Belize, highlights the importance of surface collection to the fuller understanding of ancient Maya socio-economics. Surface survey and collection at archaeological sites can lead to more precise interpretation of a site. However, jungle debris is often cleared from Maya sites with rakes, disrupting any surface collection before excavations begin. At Operation 17, care was taken not to disturb surface artifacts before excavation. Survey of surface scatter and further excavation of 4 of these units revealed that the surface and subsurface artifact concentrations were quite different. This poster looks further into the method of surface collection, and the kinds of information which can be learned from utilizing this method.


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Cite this Record

A Method for Identifying Surface Scatters in the Jungles of Belize: A Case Study from the Medicinal Trail Community. Heather McDonough, Zachary Hall, David M. Hyde. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 429723)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
Mesoamerica


Spatial Coverage

min long: -107.271; min lat: 12.383 ; max long: -86.353; max lat: 23.08 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 15979

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America