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Survey Says?!?!: A GIS Based Comparison of Site Locations and Settlement Patterns in the Gunnison Basin, Colorado

Author(s): William Ankele

Year: 2017

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Summary

In comparison to the Late Paleoindian period (10,000-8,000 rcybp), the Early Archaic (8,000-6,500 rcybp) in the Gunnison Basin, Colorado is a poorly understood time because of its relatively light archaeological signature. Not only do we have a lighter archaeological record, but we also see a change in technologies, such as projectile point types in this transitional period. Some archaeologists explain these observations as a result of changing environments and shifting settlement processes as new populations move into the basin. Others suggest the results may be due to survey bias, as archaeologists continue to survey portions of the basin. I will investigate whether there is a possible difference in site selection and settlement patterns between the two time periods that may indicate a reason for this lighter signature. Using R and ArcGIS, I will create a predictive model for both the Late Paleoindian sites and Early Archaic sites and then compare the results. These results will then be plotted against previously surveyed areas in an attempt to determine the reason for the relatively small Early Archaic record in the Gunnison Basin.


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Cite this Record

Survey Says?!?!: A GIS Based Comparison of Site Locations and Settlement Patterns in the Gunnison Basin, Colorado. William Ankele. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 429812)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
North America - Plains


Spatial Coverage

min long: -113.95; min lat: 30.751 ; max long: -97.163; max lat: 48.865 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 16584

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America