tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Understanding an Alternative Pattern of Coalescence: A Study of Architecture and Organization at a Non-fortified, Pre-Inca Town in Highland Peru

Author(s): Ryan Smith

Year: 2017

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

This study presents an analysis of the architecture and spatial organization at Maukallaqta de Nuñoa, a prehispanic site within the highlands of Peru dating to the Late Intermediate Period (AD 1000 – 1450). Within the northern Titicaca Basin where the site is located, hillforts dominate the archaeological landscape during this time as a result of increased political fragmentation and social discontinuity. While these hillforts often display very little architectural investment other than their fortification walls, Maukallaqta boasts over 300 well-preserved house structures along with dozens of chullpa burial towers, slab-cist tombs, and other structures which are unevenly distributed throughout the site. The organization and spatial relation of these structures in addition to the site’s non-fortified nature provide immediate clues as to the exceptional use of this space during the Late Intermediate Period. Preliminary results based on site-wide architectural mapping and further GIS analysis demonstrate fundamental differences between the planning, use of space, and nature of social life at Maukallaqta and that of contemporaneous hillforts.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Understanding an Alternative Pattern of Coalescence: A Study of Architecture and Organization at a Non-fortified, Pre-Inca Town in Highland Peru. Ryan Smith. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 429990)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
South America


Spatial Coverage

min long: -93.691; min lat: -56.945 ; max long: -31.113; max lat: 18.48 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 17205

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America