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Monte Bibele (Monterenzio, Italy): analysing patterns of cultural interaction between Celts, Etruscans and other Italic populations in northern Italy from the 4th to the 2nd century BC

Author(s): Erica Camurri

Year: 2017

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Summary

The site of Monte Bibele, located near Bologna (northern Italy), contains the remains of a settlement on Pianella di Monte Savino and a necropolis on Monte Tamburino, altogether dating from the 5th to the 2nd century BC. According to historical sources, this region was inhabited by Etruscans and other Italic populations, before it witnessed the invasion of Celtic tribes from the 4th century BC onwards. Following these sources, the main consequence of the invasions has to be seen either in the assimilation or in the expulsion of the local groups by the Celts, just prior to the Roman conquest of northern Italy.

Recent studies of the epigraphic record and the archaeological documentation of the region indicate a reality that is more complex and dynamic than previously assumed. Based on the site of Monte Bibele, which has to be considered one of the best documented archaeological sites of the area, I will demonstrate that the different ethnic groups mentioned in ancient sources were in fact coexisting, reaching in some cases such a profound level of social and cultural interaction that it is difficult (if not impossible) to determine their ethnic identity: Were they Celts, Etruscans, Italics, Etrusco-Celts/Celto-Etruscans, or something else entirely?


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Cite this Record

Monte Bibele (Monterenzio, Italy): analysing patterns of cultural interaction between Celts, Etruscans and other Italic populations in northern Italy from the 4th to the 2nd century BC. Erica Camurri. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430004)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
Europe


Spatial Coverage

min long: -11.074; min lat: 37.44 ; max long: 50.098; max lat: 70.845 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 17409

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America