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Inter-Household Ceramic Motif Variation and its Implications for Halaf Social Inequality at Kazane Hoyuk, SE Turkey

Author(s): Sue Ann McCarty

Year: 2017

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Summary

Inter-site motif variability is understudied in a systematic way to understand the complicated design vocabularies, paint colors, textures and vessel forms of ceramics from the Halaf cultural horizon (5,900-5,350 Cal. B.C.E./5,200-4,500 uncal. B.C.E.), a culture-historical entity in the Late Pottery Neolithic of Upper Mesopotamia (southeastern Turkey, northern Syria and northern Iraq). Together, these motifs create an almost music-like multidimensional symphony of pattern including naturalistic figures that speak to the Late Neolithic political economy. At the largest known Halaf site--Kazane Hoyuk outside modern Sanliurfa, Turkey, inter-household ceramic variability was studied in order to determine if the famously rich painted motifs on vessels show signs of clustering in association with interior and exterior household spaces and, if so, what that motif distribution means in the context of social organization at the site. This is particularly relevant because social organization remains deeply enigmatic in the Late Neolithic; vessels that may have been associated with public feasting shed light on Halaf inequality and symbolic systems.


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Cite this Record

Inter-Household Ceramic Motif Variation and its Implications for Halaf Social Inequality at Kazane Hoyuk, SE Turkey. Sue Ann McCarty. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430310)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
West Asia


Spatial Coverage

min long: 25.225; min lat: 15.115 ; max long: 66.709; max lat: 45.583 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 17642

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America