tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

A multi-proxy site formation analysis of a late Middle Pleistocene occupation in the Azraq wetlands of northeastern Jordan

Author(s): Christopher Ames

Year: 2017

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

The Azraq Marshes Archaeological and Paleoecological Project (AMAPP) aims to understand and evaluate the importance of the Azraq wetlands for Pleistocene hominin populations. Ongoing research since 2009 indicates that the northern wetland, the Druze Marsh, acted as a desert refugium for hominins throughout the Middle and Late Pleistocene. Excavations in the southern marsh—known as the Shishan Marsh—began in 2013 and uncovered a rich assemblage of bifaces, small tools, and flakes, along with fragmentary faunal remains. The Shishan Marsh 1 (SM1) occupation, which dates to approximately 250 ka, is embedded in a complex sedimentary sequence indicative of a transitional environment, from a lake to marshy ponds that formed at the edge of an alluvial fan. This paper summarizes the results of sedimentary and microbotanical analyses of the site’s stratigraphy, as well as site formation indicators from the lithic and faunal remains recovered during the 2013, 2014, and 2015 field seasons. We conclude with a discussion of the depositional history of the Shishan Marsh occupation, and implications for deciphering how the area was used by the late Middle Pleistocene inhabitants.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

A multi-proxy site formation analysis of a late Middle Pleistocene occupation in the Azraq wetlands of northeastern Jordan. Christopher Ames. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430853)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
West Asia


Spatial Coverage

min long: 25.225; min lat: 15.115 ; max long: 66.709; max lat: 45.583 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 15718

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America