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Spatial Analysis of the Preserved Wooden Architectural Remains of Eight Late Classic Maya Salt Works in Punta Ycacos Lagoon, Toledo District, Belize

Author(s): Bretton Somers

Year: 2017

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Summary

In 2005, eight Late Classic Maya sites with the remains of wooden posts were found beneath the surface of Punta Ycacos Lagoon in southern Belize. The presence of briquetage on the surface and embedded among the clusters of wooden architectural features implies association with salt production activity. This research employed a rigorous field survey, combined with mapping, sampling, and building a GIS. Detailed analysis of the spatial distribution of wooden posts was conducted to determine if comparisons could be drawn to ethnohistoric examples of wooden architecture reported among the Maya and in Mesoamerica. This research found that there are patterns in post distribution, some of which compare to ethnohistoric examples of wooden architecture. This study emphasizes that there are rectilinear patterns in the placement of posts. This research did find positive results from the use of in-the-field GIS analysis to recognize patterns and predict missing data. This study was part of a larger on-going project "Mapping Ancient Maya Wooden Architecture on the Seafloor" that will continue to address these problems and build upon this research.


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Spatial Analysis of the Preserved Wooden Architectural Remains of Eight Late Classic Maya Salt Works in Punta Ycacos Lagoon, Toledo District, Belize. Bretton Somers. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 431481)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
Mesoamerica


Spatial Coverage

min long: -107.271; min lat: 12.383 ; max long: -86.353; max lat: 23.08 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 16323

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America