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A Frontier in Bloom: Social Implications of Architectural Diversity and Conformity during the Colonization of the San Juan Region of the Northern Southwest

Author(s): Shanna Diederichs

Year: 2017

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Summary

Behavioral conformity and, its inverse, behavioral diversity are social adaptations wielded by small scale agricultural societies faced with change. By the sixth and seventh centuries A.D., the Basketmaker III period, long standing conflicts in the San Juan region of the northern Southwest had abated and new territories opened to agricultural colonization. Frontier colonization is by nature a contentious process that usually results in violence, displacement, and the reinforcement of factions. In contrast, the San Juan Region saw an unprecedented period of peace and integration during colonization. This study demonstrates how Basketmaker III populations mitigated conflict by signaling solidarity and common identity in the Frontier through architectural conformity at community centers while allowing for architectural variation and expression at single family farmsteads. These practices, in turn, may have set the stage for the development of kinship and non-kinship based institutions in the Ancestral Pueblo world.


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A Frontier in Bloom: Social Implications of Architectural Diversity and Conformity during the Colonization of the San Juan Region of the Northern Southwest. Shanna Diederichs. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 431763)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -115.532; min lat: 30.676 ; max long: -102.349; max lat: 42.033 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 15883

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America