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Community Resilience in the Río Amarillo East Pocket: Commoner Occupation around Río Amarillo and Quebrada Piedras Negras at the end of Late Classic through Postclassic Periods

Author(s): Edy Barrios ; Cameron L. McNeil ; Mauricio Díaz ; Antolín Velásquez ; Walter Burgos

Year: 2017

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Summary

Recent and ongoing research at residential groups at the sites of Río Amarillo and Quebrada Piedras Negras are providing a better understanding of the lives of commoners and of the population dynamics during the Late Classic through the Postclassic period in this area. These sites share the second-widest pocket of the Copan River Valley, and lie in the middle of one of the main trade routes between Copan and Quirigua. The excavations and mapping of the household groups distributed in this landscape provide an increased understanding of the people who inhabited this region close to the Copan metropolis during a time of complicated political, economic, and environmental change. Of particular interest are some of the differences found in the material culture of these sites, which all lie within the visual limit of each other. This paper will discuss both results of specific households and those of a larger mapping program.


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Cite this Record

Community Resilience in the Río Amarillo East Pocket: Commoner Occupation around Río Amarillo and Quebrada Piedras Negras at the end of Late Classic through Postclassic Periods. Edy Barrios, Cameron L. McNeil, Mauricio Díaz, Antolín Velásquez, Walter Burgos. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 431173)


Keywords

General
communities Copan Maya

Geographic Keywords
Mesoamerica


Spatial Coverage

min long: -107.271; min lat: 12.383 ; max long: -86.353; max lat: 23.08 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 16662

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America