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Ancient Hominin Bone Proteomes: Improving our Understanding of Past Human Behavior through the Study of Ancient Bone Proteins.

Author(s): Frido Welker ; Jean-Jacques Hublin ; Matthew Collins

Year: 2017

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Summary

The analysis of ancient proteins is increasingly used to study archaeological and anthropological bone specimens from prehistoric time periods. This ranges from large-scale ZooMS screening (Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry) of morphologically unidentifiable specimens to the targeted analysis of ancient bone proteomes from humans through the application of LC-MS/MS. Here, some biological and phylogenetic results that can be obtained through the analysis of ancient human bone proteomes will be discussed in the light of the Châtelperronian, "transitional", technocomplex of western Europe. This technocomplex is chronologically placed between Middle Palaeolithic (MP) and Upper Palaeolithic (UP) lithic industries and displays behavioural aspects interpreted as intermediate between what is typically seen in the MP and UP. Despite intense research interest, the biological association of the Châtelperronian to either Neanderthals and/or Anatomically Modern Humans remains much debated. The analysis of a Pleistocene hominin bone proteome associated to the Châtelperronian allowed us to establish the biological affiliation of this specimen, and this will be presented together with biological insights obtained through the analysis of the same bone proteome.


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Ancient Hominin Bone Proteomes: Improving our Understanding of Past Human Behavior through the Study of Ancient Bone Proteins.. Frido Welker, Jean-Jacques Hublin, Matthew Collins. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 431365)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
Europe


Spatial Coverage

min long: -11.074; min lat: 37.44 ; max long: 50.098; max lat: 70.845 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 15944

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America