Society for Historical Archaeology

This collection contains the abstracts and presentations from the Society for Historical Archaeology annual meetings. SHA has partnered with Digital Antiquity to archive their annual conference abstracts and make the presentations available. This collection contains meeting abstracts and presentations dating from 2013 to the present.

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Formed in 1967, the Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA) is the largest scholarly group concerned with the archaeology of the modern world (A.D. 1400-present). The main focus of the society is the era since the beginning of European exploration. SHA promotes scholarly research and the dissemination of knowledge concerning historical archaeology. The society is specifically concerned with the identification, excavation, interpretation, and conservation of sites and materials on land and underwater. Geographically the society emphasizes the New World, but also includes European exploration and settlement in Africa, Asia, and Oceania. Ethical principles of the society are set forth in Article VII of SHA’s Bylaws and specified in a statement adopted on June 21 2003.

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  • 1,000 Bottles of Wine in the Ground, 1,000 Bottles of Wine: The Preservation of early 20th century Italian Heritage at the John Bradford House (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sara E. Belkin.

    In 1919, the production of intoxicating beverages was legally prohibited in the United States. However, excavations in the 1970s at the John Bradford House in Kingston, MA indicate that its inhabitants at the turn-of-the-century were consuming large quantities of wine, champagne, and hard liquor. These bottles were consumed and then discarded at a time when the consumption of alcohol was considered immoral by the American middle class. This paper will explore the meaning behind the presence of...

  • A 15th to 19th century housing district in the center of Elbeuf (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Benedicte Guillot. Elisabeth Lecler-Huby.

    La fouille d’un quartier d’habitations dans le centre-ville d’Elbeuf en Haute-Normandie a permis d’étudier l’évolution de l’occupation entre le 15e et le 19e siècle. Le site comprend des îlots constitués de petites maisons associés à des cours et des jardins comprenant silos, latrines et fosses d’aisances. Le mobilier comprend une importante quantité de faïences et de céramiques communes reflétant la vie quotidienne de ce quartier à l’époque moderne. La communication s’attachera plus...

  • 1607 to 1619: An Examination of Change over Time at James Fort (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Danny W. Schmidt. Lisa E. Fischer.

    Within the first few weeks of landing on Jamestown Island in the spring of 1607 the colonists set about constructing a triangular palisaded fort. At first tents served to house the colonists, and to shelter their place of worship. Slowly but surely with the first public buildings, the storehouse and the church, more permanent structures began to rise. The interior of the fort would see many changes during these years, both reflected in the documentary record as well as the archaeological record....

  • A 1611 Blockhouse and Earthworks for the Protection of Cattle: Virginia’s Earliest Bovine Husbandry, near Jamestown (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Alain C. Outlaw.

    From the earliest years of the English colonization of Virginia, Bos taurus played a significant role in settlement as a source of meat, dairy products, and draft power. Following the "Starving Time" winter of 1609/1610, when everything wild and domestic that could be eaten was consumed, including human flesh, on-the-hoof animals, as opposed to barreled beef, entered the colony.  These animals soon were being taken by Native Americans.  Thus, upon his arrival in May 1611, Sir Thomas Dale ordered...

  • A 16th-Century Public Dump in Rouen (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Benedicte Guillot. Elisabeth Lecler-Huby.

    Un site destiné à recueillir les déchets des habitations voisines au nord-ouest du centre-ville historique de Rouen, aux abords du château de Philippe-Auguste, a été fouillé en 2012. Cet immense dépotoir a livré une grande diversité de mobilier archéologique illustrant la vie quotidienne de la ville de Rouen au 16e siècle. L’abondante céramique domestique associée à quelques pièces plus luxueuses, témoigne d’une consommation locale et extra-régionale (céramiques du Beauvaisis ou grès...

  • The 1725 Nuestra Señora de Begoña: Ongoing Investigations of a Spanish Merchant Fragata and Cultural Conservation Strategies in La Caleta de Caucedo, Dominican Republic (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew J Maus. Charles D Beeker.

    On 21 May 1725 the Spanish merchant vessel Nuestra Señora de Begoña wrecked in La Caleta de Caucedo on the south coast of Hispaniola.  While there was no loss of life, contemporary legal texts pertaining to the sinking event document the complete loss of ship and cargo, ineffective salvage efforts, and the conviction of its captain for contraband silver.  Indiana University has conducted excavations of the shoreward spillage area of the Nuestra Señora de Begoña since 2010.  Preliminary findings...

  • 175 Water Street to Washington Square Park: is flexibility the key to urban archaeology? (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Joan H. Geismar.

    Thirty years ago, during what could be called the ‘Golden Age’ of New York City archaeology, I served as PI on a block-wide urban project in Lower Manhattan. The field methods were traditional, albeit with the help of a backhoe, and the findings spectacular. Three decades later, as ‘Project Archaeologist’ for the reconstruction of a park in historic Greenwich Village, the archaeology relied even more on heavy equipment and was limited to monitoring or testing associated with the introduction of...

  • The 1799 Siege of Acre: A Re-evaluation of the Historical and Archaeological Record (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Morgan Breene.

    Napoleon’s failed siege of Acre, Israel in the spring of 1799 was a turning point in his eastern campaign. Had he succeeded in gaining control of the port, he would have been well-positioned to challenge Britain’s influence in the East. It was only through the assistance of the British naval commander Admiral William Sidney Smith that the city was able to withstand the siege; Smith kept up a constant bombardment of Napoleon’s position from his fleet for over two months. Understandably,...

  • The 1812 period Naval Hospital at Point Frederick, Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jeffrey Seibert.

    Over the last five years, archaeologists’ understanding of the War of 1812 Naval Establishment at Point Frederick / Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario has undergone some profound changes. Among these is the recognition that the 1812 period naval hospital does not correspond with the current Commandant’s house, but instead represents an entirely separate and ruined structure associated within the same area of the complex as the Commandant’s house but distinct from it. Through the...

  • The 1839 Parker Academy: On the Frontier of Transformative Resistance and Social Justice (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Peggy Brunache. Sharyn Jones.

    The Parker Academy, founded in 1839 in southern Ohio, was the first secondary school in the country to house multiracial, coeducational classrooms. Furthermore, several primary sources suggest it was also a participatory component of the Underground Railroad network. This paper highlights our findings of recent excavations and continuing archival research to explore how the school was a site of everyday resistance under a framework of transformative change through education for a multi-racial...

  • The 18th Century Shipbuilding French Industry : New Perspective on Conception and Construction (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Marijo Gauthier-Bérubé.

    The Machault, a French frigate, sank in Chaleur Bay, Québec, in the context of the Seven Years War, in 1760. Built in Bayonne, the archaeological analysis of the frigate gave us a unique vision of the 18th century shipbuilding industry. Coming from a privation shipyard next to the Arsenal of Bayonne, the Machault lay amidst a clash between regional shipbuilding traditions and the globalisation of naval techniques in Europe.   The study of the ship’s structural remains provides a unique view of...

  • 18th Century Stoneware From New Jersey (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only William Liebeknecht.

    The origins of the New Jersey stoneware industry -- and perhaps even the American stoneware industry -- seem to lie in the late 17th century with an awareness that high-grade clays suitable for making dense, hard, durable pottery were present in the South Amboy area of Middlesex County in the Province of East Jersey.  As early as 1685-86, there are indications in the court records of Burlington County in West Jersey that such clays were known to early settlers.  This clay source was presumably...

  • 18th-Century San Antonio Spanish Colonial Mission Complexes: An Evolution, American Revolution, and Tejano Ranchos1 (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sergio A. Iruegas.

    Recent historical archaeology studies have provided new perspectives of indigenous interaction with Spanish Colonial Missions in the United States. By 1718, Texas colonists were the product of Spanish and native intermarriage for over 200 years before their arrival. Few studies have considered the multicultural aspects’ effect to the historic landscape and archaeological record. An emic perspective of how 18th-Century Tejano Ranchos evolved from the Spanish Mission complex has yet to be...

  • The 1977 Excavations of French Fort St. Pierre (1719-1729): Adaptation on the Louisiane Frontier   (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only LisaMarie Malischke.

    Dr. Ian W. Brown excavated the site of French Fort St. Pierre, near Vicksburg, Mississippi, from 1974 to 1976. A 1977 season by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History was never fully reported. As part of a new dissertation project, an initial report as to the contents of this collection will be presented. The artifact assemblage suggests that the garrison and other inhabitants of Fort St. Pierre suffered from a lack of supplies that led them to adapt to frontier life by turning to...

  • 19th Century Clay Pipes from Jacksonport State Park, Arkansas (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only C. Andrew Buchner. Karla M. Oesch.

    Excavations at the Jacksonport State Park over the 2014 to 2015 field season have produced over 65,000 artifacts. This material has providing information about the lives of Jacksonport's residents from its prominence and period of historical significance (1852-1892) and on to the subsequent poor house era (1910-1953). Within this extensive collection are several campaign/ president pipes imported from Germany from circa 1830 to circa 1870. The identifiable specimens include presidential...

  • 19th Century Entertainments From A Small Plantation In Alexandria, Virginia: Archaeology At Shuter’s Hill (44AX175) (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Terilee Edwards-Hewitt.

    The archaeology of childhood is underrepresented in the archaeological literature. Identifying children’s toys can be complex since many recreational objects, such as Frozen Charlottes, dominos, marbles, harmonicas and mouth harps, were used by both children and adults. Other toys found at this archaeological site are solely associated with children, primarily metal military figures and dolls. Shuter’s Hill, located in Alexandria, Virginia, was a small plantation located near Washington, D.C....

  • 19th century industry in the American South: Scull Shoals Mill Village (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Stacy J. Lundgren. James Wettstaed.

    The shoals of the Oconee River have greatly influenced early American settlement and land use in Georgia, one of the United States’ original thirteen colonies.   Scull Shoals, a major river crossing in what is now Greene County, became the location of a small frontier settlement on the east bank of the Oconee River in the 1790s.  After the turn of the century, industry at the shoals included a water-powered grist mill and Georgia’s first paper mill.  In the following decades, mill operations at...

  • A 19th Century Military Landscape in Southern Maryland (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Aaron M. Levinthal.

    The Maryland State Highway Administration's recent archaeological investigations in Charles County have helped to increase the understanding of a landscape that directly contributed to events that shaped a developing nation. The discovery and study of several War of 1812 and Civil War sites and loci, all within close proximity of one another, the port town of Benedict, and major waterborne and overland transportation corridors, has provided insights on choices made by 19th century military...

  • 19th Century Reform and Control at the Industrial School for Girls in Dorchester, Massachusetts (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only maddie penney.

    An examination of the nineteenth century adornment assemblage from the Industrial School for Girls in Dorchester, Massachusetts, archaeologically excavated by Joseph Bagley and the Boston City Archaeology Lab during the summer of 2015. The school was staffed and administered by middle and upper-class Boston influenced by a Second Great Awakening reform movement, in which piety was the foundation for a number of reform efforts, including femininity, domesticity, and spiritual materialism. The...

  • 19th Century Workhorses: The Examination of a Centerboard Schooner off Dog Island, Florida. (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Horrell.

    Between 2001 and 2003, the Dog and St. George Islands Shipwreck Survey, a research project conducted by the Florida State University Program in Underwater Archaeology, investigated a mid-to-late 19th century wooden-hulled centerboard schooner.  This site, while integral to instructing students on the various methodologies and techniques utilized to conduct archaeological investigations underwater, provides a glimpse into the Gulf of Mexico’s maritime history and culture.  To date, the shipwreck...

  • 19th-Century Innovation at a 21st-Century Industrial Park: Archaeological Investigations at the Valentine and Company Iron Ore Washing Plant, Centre County, Pennsylvania (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Gary F. Coppock.

    It was during a standard Phase I archaeological survey for a proposed Centre County industrial park that the buried remains of a 19th-century industrial plant − the Valentine Iron Ore Washing Plant (36CE526) − were discovered.  Subsequent investigations revealed not only the layout of the facility, but also the important role that a local ironmaster had on the entire iron industry.  In 1815 several Valentine brothers relocated to Centre County to lease an idle iron furnace.  Soon they were...

  • 2 Cool 4 School: An Alaskan Archaeology HipHop Tale (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only MoHagani Magentek Adamu.

    What fun is historical archaeology when it seldom reaches outside academia and into the public spheres? This presentation is a tale about a HipHop Archaeologist in Alaska finding her way outside her boundaries of African American Archaeologies and Burial Ground Studies. Burnt out from academic studies and school, Ms. Mahogany Bones and Lady Plup set out on an unofficial archaeological investigation to the Old Knik Townsite Museum. They have no preconceptions or a premise for their research other...

  • The 2012 Field Season of the 1630-31 New Spain Fleet Archaeological Project in the Gulf of Mexico (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Roberto Junco. Flor Trejo.

    The 2012 Field season of the 1630-31 New Spain Fleet Project of the Subdirección de Arqueología Subacuática INAH, has been a success and represents a leap in many regards from previous seasons. The project started in the year 1995 and has had many people involved throughout the years implementing diverse search methods and surveys. In the case of the 2012 field season, success came from a thoroughly thought methodological process to present a search area in the Gulf of Mexico where the Admiral...

  • The 2018 Discovery of "Lady Lex", the First American Aircraft Carrier Casualty (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kervin Michaud. Alexis Catsambis.

    This is an abstract from the "Developing Standard Methods, Public Interpretation, and Management Strategies on Submerged Military Archaeology Sites" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Three thousand meters below the surface of the Coral Sea lies one of the earliest U.S. aircraft carriers. USS Lexington (CV-2), alongside 35 of her aircraft and 216 of her crew, was lost in May of 1942 during the Battle of the Coral Sea, the first engagement between...

  • 21st Century Commemoration and the Landscapes of an Absent Past: Remembering with Places in Santa Rosa, CA (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Margaret Purser.

    Located in an overwhelmingly Democratic county, Santa Rosa's neighborhoods returned decidedly mixed results in the 2016 presidential race. Ensuing public discourse has invoked long-standing rhetoric about who "really belongs" in the community of immigrants, based on arrival time. But unlike Confederate monuments in the South, Santa Rosa’s historical narrative is less openly contested in its commemorative sites and monuments than it is essentially absent altogether. This historically silent...

  • 21st Century Methods for a 19th Century World: GIS, Geophysical Survey, and Geoarchaeology in Washington, D.C. (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Charde Reid.

    New and non-traditional techniques such as the geographic information system (GIS), geophysical survey, and geoarchaeology show great promise for investigating changing landscapes and urban deposition patterns. The Washington, D.C. Historic Preservation Office has begun implementing these non-invasive techniques as part of most Phase I investigations, especially in highly-developed areas. They are a cost-effective, efficient, and fast ways to identify areas of fill, buried stream channels,...

  • 21st Century Shipwreck Management Considerations on Lake Champlain (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Sabick.

    The ongoing management of Lake Champlain's extraordinary collection of well-preserved Cultural Resources is an ever evolving and often challenging effort.  With the advent of new and cheaper technologies available to everyday boaters the locations of sensitive shipwrecks are easily detectable.  The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum is invested in applying new approaches and ideas to shipwreck management and this presentation will discuss some of the museums latest efforts in this dynamic management...

  • 21st-century Collaboration for Studying a 20th-century Working Community (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Frederick E. Sutherland.

    This paper explores the social and economic effects on working communities in a former iron mining district in central Minnesota. Scholars and community members collaborated to document multiple standing structures of historic significance and hold discussions on how those sites could be preserved and featured in future cultural tourism plans. The narratives generated from the collaboration were strengthened by overlapping thematic categories used in multi-sited archaeology.

  • 3-D Photo Modeling Applications in Underwater Archeology (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Brett Seymour.

    Recent advances in 3-D modeling technologies have entered the field of Archeology. The Submerged Resources Center (SRC) of the National Park Service has begun using this technology in the field of Underwater Archeology. Using the Autodesk program ReCap and underwater digital photography SRC photographers have been able to create 3-D models of discreet features and more recently of whole sites. This paper will introduce the technology of 3-D point clouds and compare the final products of the 3-D...

  • 30 Years Later: Revisiting the 1733 San Pedro Underwater Archaeological Preserve and San Felipe Shipwreck Sites in the Florida Keys (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel I. Haskell. Matthew S. Lawrence. Charles D Beeker. Kirsten M. Hawley. Tori Galloway.

    This is an abstract from the "Reflections, Practice, and Ethics in Historical Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In 1988, Indiana University (IU) assisted the State of Florida in the survey and inspection of the 1733 San Pedro and San Felipe shipwrecks with the goal of selecting a candidate for the creation of an underwater archaeological preserve. In April 1989, the San Pedro Underwater Archaeological Preserve State Park was opened to...

  • 300 Years: Archival and Archaeological Investigations at the Mission San Antonio de Valero (The Alamo) Probable First Site (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kay Hindes. Susan R Snow.

    The Mission San Antonio de Valero (known as The Alamo) was established in 1718, by Father Antonio Olivares. The mission was believed to be located in its first location for about 12 months before it was moved to a second location. The third and final location is where it is located today in Alamo Plaza. The first site location has been lost for almost 300 years. In February, 2013, Kay Hindes, City Archaeologist for the City of San Antonio located a number of artifacts that are colonial in age in...

  • 37 Pounds of Beads!: Reconstructing Provenience and Looking for Change and Continuity in an Orphaned Collection (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Melanie S Lerman.

    This paper aims to understand processes of change and continuity by examining how the introduction of European manufactured glass beads in the 16th-19th centuries affected preexisting native shell bead consumption strategies in Southern California. Data from two different coastal burial sites that were occupied by the Tongva/Gabrieliño people will be analyzed; one from an 1877 excavation on Santa Catalina Island that has virtually no provenience information, and another from more recent...

  • 3D Digitization of Archaeological Artifatcts in Conservation (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Dostal.

    At the Conservation Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University, recent projects have all implemented some form of 3D modeling of artifacts as part of the documentation process for either before treatment, after treatment, or both.  The logistics of the implementation of 3D modeling as a standard documentation technique for every artifact in a collection can be daunting, especially when dealing with untreated waterlogged artifacts that must remain wet before conservation. This paper discusses...

  • The 3D Digitization of the World Trade Center Wreck (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Dostal.

    Accurate documentation of cultural heritage materials is the lynchpin for all aspects of archaeological investigation. When it comes to the reconstruction and interpretation of shipwrecks, this is especially true. The more accurate and true to life the documentation is, the more accurate the interpretation and reconstruction of a ship will be. The methods by which ships have been documented have evolved rapidly over the years, though each new and innovative method is tied to foundational...

  • 3D in the Toolbox: An Operational Comparison of Acoustic, Photogrammetric, and Laser Scanning Methodologies Tested at Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary in 2016. (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only John C. Bright.

    The clear, fresh waters of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary offer an ideal testing ground for acoustic and light-based imaging systems. During the 2016 field season, Thunder Bay researchers conducted several field operations to acquire, process, and compare side scan sonar, multibeam sonar, laser-scanner, and photogrammetric data at numerous archaeological shipwreck sites. The resulting analysis provided valuable insights into this array of remote sensing systems in terms of their ability...

  • 3D Laser Scanning for the digital reconstruction and analysis of a 16th Century clinker built sailing vessel (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Pat T Tanner.

     Using the Drogheda boat scaled physical model as a starting point, the following paper discusses a methodology that has been created to develop and analyse the hydrostatic and hydrodynamic characteristics of a reconstructed hull form. The physical boat model was 3D laser scanned and virtually modelled using commercially available CAD modelling software. Using boatbuilding experience, the recorded model is then "repaired", rebuilding the entire vessel, including recreating any missing...

  • 3D Learning at Kingsley Plantation and the St. Augustine Lighthouse: Incorporating 3D Technology Into FPAN Public Archaeology Outreach (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kevin A Gidusko. Sarah Miller.

    An important aspect of public archaeology efforts is the need to utilize new, innovative methods to engage a changing public. The use of 3D modeling and printing technology currently offers a novel approach to improve extant methods of public interaction. This paper discusses FPAN’s efforts to incorporate 3D technology into public outreach, especially via inclusion into curricula already in use by the network. "Investigating a Tabby Slave Cabin" and "Investigating a Light Station," part of...

  • 3D Modelling and Interactive Mapping of Historic Shipwreck Sites (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael J Postons.

    Recent developments in technology have made the process of recording terrestrial archaeological sites a much more digital affair.  The same can now be said for underwater historical sites such as shipwrecks.  This paper will explore through a number of UK and US projects carried out during 2012, showing how shipwrecks can be mapped and modelled in 3D, the process involved, and the exciting public outreach formats that can be created.  From web based interactive 3D shipwreck tours, to game-engine...

  • 3D Printing an Archaeological Site Map: Photogrammetric Recording and Printing of the Pillar Dollar Wreck (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Anne E. Wright.

    During the 2016 East Carolina University field school at Biscayne National Park, photogrammetric data was collected to 3D print a sitemap using a ZCorp 3D printer. This printer is a resin-based printer that uses a 24-bit color pallet to print a full range of color. In addition to Photoscan, this process utilizes a free, open-source 3D rendering and animation software called Blender to perfect  and render the model usable for 3D printing software. The sitemap was then 3D printed for use in the...

  • 3D Printing for Maritime Cultural Heritage: A Design for All Approach (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Anne E. Wright.

    This is an abstract from the "Technology in Terrestrial and Underwater Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. This research examines issues in accessibility to maritime cultural heritage. Using the Pillar Dollar Wreck, this research presents an approach to public outreach based on the concept of Design for All. Design for All advocates creating products that are accessible and functional for all users. As a part of this project, an exhibit...

  • 3D Printing for Submerged Heritage: A Comparative Study in Structured Light and Photogrammetry (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Anne E. Wright.

    This paper seeks to compare the 3D modeling techniques of photogrammetry and structured light to create 3D models of propellers found on a variety of shipwrecks. Additionally, this project seeks to determine best practices for 3D printing in situ heritage on submerged archaeological sites, focusing particularly on structural elements. This project focuses on three main case studies: Montana at Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, and two shipwreck sites near the Outer Banks of North...

  • 3D Scanning Sonar: A discussion of its applications and limitations based on recent tests by the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Sabick.

    Over the last two summers the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum (LCMM) has had the opportunity to deploy a 3D Scanning Sonar unit in its archaeological fieldwork. This emerging technology offers many advantages for the assessment and study of submerged cultural resources including ease of deployment and the ability to operate well in low-visibility situations. In 2012 the LCMM employed the sonar unit in a detailed examination of the Sloop Island Canal Boat. This vessel had been documented with...

  • 3D to 2D to 3D ‘ The Reconstruction of the H.L Hunley’s Forward Crew Compartment (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Benjamin Rennison.

    3D to 2D to 3D ‘ The reconstruction of the H.L Hunley’s Forward Crew Compartment.Since its recovery and excavation, archaeologists have employed advanced 3D measurement techniques to document the H.L Hunley submarine. The archaeological team has employed the traditional survey techniques such as; photography and illustration to record the vessel, and most notably, employed advanced techniques such as; 3D point measurement systems, laser scanning, color structured light scanning, and...

  • 3D Virtual Landscape Analysis at Fort Ethan Allen, VA (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Brian Crane. Wally Owen.

    As part of archaeological investigations carried out at Fort Ethan Allen, VA for the Arlington County Department of Community Planning, Neighborhood Services, Versar prepared a 3D digital model of the fort and its environs as it may have appeared during the Civil War. Fort Ethan Allen was among the forts erected by the Union in 1861 to defend Washington, DC. Only small portions of the earthworks are still visible, and the surrounding area has been entirely transformed by suburban development....

  • 3D Virtual Landscape Analysis of 18th-century Settlement in the Swedes Tract, PA (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Brian Crane.

    Manatanien, or Manatawny, present-day Douglasville in Berks County, PA, was settled by second generation Swedes within a 10,000 acre tract along the Schuykill River granted by William Penn in 1701. During the first decades of the 18th century, Swedish, German, and English settlers cleared long narrow plots of land anchored on the river within the so-called Swedes Tract. Combining historical maps and records with a 3D digital model of the community created in Autodesk Maya allows for a detailed...

  • 500 Years of Experience at a Ten-Year Old Museum: Positives And Pitfalls of Avocational Cooperation (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Eric Ray.

    The Museum of the Coastal Bend in Victoria, Texas, has a large prehistoric collection, largely collected by avocational archaeologists. This is not unusual for a museum. What is perhaps more unusual is the extent to which ongoing research is conducted under the aegis of the museum.In an era of tight budgets, when many universities have had to cut back fieldwork, the museum’s field research program is expanding. The research program is active at multiple long-term sites, as well as providing...

  • The 7,000 Foot Wreck – An Archaeological Investigation of a Historic Shipwreck Discovered in the Gulf of Mexico (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Westrick.

    The 7,000 Foot Wreck is the remains of a historic sailing vessel lost in the Gulf of Mexico.  The site lies at a depth of 7,450 feet (2,271 meters) and represents one of the deepest historic shipwrecks investigated in the GOM to date.  The wreck was originally discovered during an oil and gas exploration deep tow survey in 1986.  In September 2009 the first ROV investigation of the 7,000 Foot Wreck was conducted as part of the Lophelia II: Rigs, Reefs, and Wrecks Study.  Over a roughly 15½-hour...

  • 97 Acres, Deep Cisterns and a Pit Filled with Over 2,000 Beer Bottles: Challenges in Urban Archaeology Through the Investigation of the NGA West Site (23SL2393) (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Meredith M Hawkins Trautt.

    The new National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) will be constructed on 97 acres within a former working-class neighborhood in North St. Louis. It was clear from the beginning, for various reasons, that a traditional cultural resource study was not feasible. This presentation will outline the methodological approaches that led to the identification and mitigation of the NGA West Site (23SL2393), the challenges encountered during the laboratory analysis, and ongoing research questions in...

  • The A7 Project - An investigation of HM Submarine A7 (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Peter Holt.

    January 2014 was the 100th anniversary of the loss of the Royal Navy submarine A7, sunk during a training exercise off Plymouth, England.  All contemporary salvage attempts failed and the submarine was abandoned on the seabed and forgotten, but the wreck was rediscovered by sports divers in 1981.  In 2001, problems with sports divers removing parts of the submarine prompted the UK Ministry of Defence to designate the site under the Protection of Military Remains Act and all diving was banned. In...

  • ‘”[A] sweet life after a most fatiguing campaign”’: The Evolution and Archaeology of Military Encampments of the Revolutionary War (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jesse West-Rosenthal.

    Despite the breadth of information that has been recorded regarding the American Revolution, little is known about the day-to-day life of the American soldier. Much has been ingrained in the American psyche concerning the mythic lore regarding the Continental Army during Revolutionary War. The archaeology of the Revolutionary War encampment provides researchers with an uncanny glimpse into the daily lives of the Revolutionary War soldier, as well as the broader patterns that shaped the conflict....

  • Abalone Shell, Broken Pots, Hearths, Windbreaks and Archival Research: Clues to Identifying 19th Century California Abalone Colection and Processing Sites on the Channel Islands (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Judy Berryman.

    The Chinese abalone and fisheries in California developed in the late 1850s, flourished, and then delcined  in the early 1900s. The majority of California Chinese studies have focused on immigrant populations in established urban Chinatowns. Much less attention has been given to economic strategies and survival mechanisms associated with rural communities, specialized labor camps, or fishing camps. Many of these industries were first developed in the West by Chinese immigrants only to be taken...

  • Abandoned Rural Settlements and Landscape Transformations in the Early Modern and Modern Period: Innovative Methodological Approaches of Historical Archaeology within a Central European Context (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Lukáš Holata. Michal Preusz.

    Settlement and landscape transformations in Central Europe during the Early Modern/Modern period were beyond interest until 1990s and, ironically, remain insufficiently recognised despite better preservation of sites, larger collections of artefacts and broader data sources. Nevertheless, complexity of sites, often with extensive destructions, and a requirement of integration very variable data sources (especially a combination with written evidence and historical maps is significant) generate a...

  • The Abbey of Pedro Mártir de Anglería – Excavation, Reconstruction and Conservation of an Early 16th Century Ecclesiastical Structure in Jamaica (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Robyn P Woodward.

    Christianity anchored the material practices and social institutions of the Spanish settlers in the New World and while Christian friars undoubted arrived in Jamaica with the initial group of settlers in 1509, the Jamaican abbacy was not formally founded until 1515. The ecclesiastical authorities used temporary thatch and wood structures for worship at the capital of Sevilla la Nueva until funds were provided for the construction of a stone church in 1524.  The abbey however, was not quite...

  • Abolition and the Rise of the Aku: Creating Ethnicity through Colonial Policy on the Gambia River (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Liza Gijanto.

    The Gambian capital of Banjul was founded as part of British abolition efforts in West Africa.  A planned urban center, its earliest residents included the Aku, or Liberated Africans resettled from Sierra Leone and captured slave vessels.  The Aku identity formed over several decades in The Gambia largely through self-identification as the ‘other’ African and British subjects in the 19th century.  In the early 20th century they were the Gambian elite and became the driving force behind the...

  • Above and Below Ground: Teaching Combined Methodologies for a Holistic Understanding of the Built Environment (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kyla Cools. Katherine Boyle.

    During the summer of 2017, the University of Maryland’s Anthracite Heritage Program held a combined historic preservation and archaeological field school at Eckley Miners’ Village in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Complementing the University’s dual masters in applied anthropology and historic preservation, this field school emphasized the value of utilizing historic preservation and archaeology to inform one another. This field school has provided an invaluable opportunity for students to learn the...

  • Above and Beyond the Lowstand: Three Lithic Artifacts Recovered from the Gulf of Maine (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Franklin Price. Arthur Spiess.

    This paper will discuss three prehistoric lithic artifacts discovered by fishermen in the area of Mount Desert Island, Maine. All three artifacts were recovered while using heavy equipment to harvest shellfish from the seafloor. The first two artifacts were found by scallop draggers in areas sub-aerial during the last glacial lowstand, making it possible that they are from submerged terrestrial contexts. The third find was brought to the surface in a quahog bucket from depths below the lowstand,...

  • Above-ground Archaeology Of Industrial And Post-Industrial Detroit (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Amanda Sosnowski. Suzanne Spencer-Wood.

    A survey of Detroit’s ruins reveals the spread of industrial decline among all kinds of sites, and the post-industrial transformation of urban landscapes. Maps show the spread of abandonment from factories to other businesses, transportation sites, and residential areas, including schools and police stations. Photos of abandoned buildings show the processes of decay and ruination, from vandalism to the weather. What can Detroit teach archaeologists about the interpretation of material evidence...

  • Academia in Underwater Archaeology (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Benchley.

    This paper will explore the opportunities and constraints placed on academic programs that include underwater archaeology in a research and/or applied curriculum. While opportunities for new directions may abound, constraints on funding, staffing, curriculum development, and return on investment are real and inhibit sustained change. The conservative nature of academic program accreditation, and its impact on multidisciplinary programs, will be addressed.

  • Acadian Adaptations in North and South America (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Steven R. Pendery.

    The tragedy of the deportation of the Acadians from their homeland by the British in the 1750s was compounded by their exploitation by the French government at the conclusion of the Seven Years War. French imperial policy focused on settling and developing portions of tropical colonies such as French Guiana with Acadians and Europeans in order to minimize slave labor.  Although more than 9,000 colonists perished upon their arrival in La Guyane, a few hundred Acadians survived in extended coastal...

  • Access to First Choice Foods and Settlement Failure at French Azilum (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Maureen Costura.

    Azilum in northern Pennsylvania was a thriving community of French aristocrats and enslaved Africans that existed from 1793-1809. Despite many advantages, including wealth and cultural capital, the settlement eventually vanished. This paper will argue that a major detrimental factor to the success of Azilum was the lack of access to first choice foods. Modern global food systems are designed in part to assure cultural elites constant access to first choice foods. In the case of Azilum,...

  • Accommodating personalities: the role of purpose-built mill workers’ housing in communal identity (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Suzanne Lilley.

    At the end of the 18th century, Derbyshire in England witnessed unprecedented social upheaval with the introduction of the first water-powered cotton mills along the Derwent Valley. These ventures brought fame and fortune for the mill-owners; however, they also transformed the local demographic from dispersed agricultural hamlets into prominent industrial communities. Brought together within purpose-built settlements, mill workers gained not only innovative forms of accommodation (industrial...

  • The Accotink Quarter (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Boyd Sipe.

    The Accotink Quarter was a circa 1720 to 1769 outlying tobacco plantation quarter site in Fairfax County, Virginia. Intact historic features and artifact deposits indicated the location of an overseer’s house and a dwelling for enslaved laborers. The overseer during the late period of the occupation was identified from store accounts where his purchases of various goods for himself and the quarter were documented. A total of 1,400 colonoware sherds representing a minimum of 197 vessels were...

  • An Account of Ancient Stone Anchors in the Northern Shoreline of the Persian Gulf (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sorna Khakzad.

    This is an abstract from the "Current Research in Maritime Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. This paper is an introduction to the historical stone anchors in the Northern shoreline of the Persian Gulf. This area is under ongoing and rapid urban and industrial development, with limited systematic studies on the underwater and coastal cultural heritage. This paper presents a collection of stone anchors and stone weights, which has been...

  • Accuracy of Underwater Photogrammetric Methods: The Case Study of the Invincible Wreck Site (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Benjamin Jones. Fraser Sturt.

    This report presents an accuracy analysis of the 2016 underwater photogrammetric survey of the HMS Invincible, an at-risk British wreck of historic import, which afforded the opportunity to compare the three-dimensional models generated by a variety of widely available cameras. In a two-phase project, photogrammetric data from the Invincible wreck site was compared against swath bathymetry, and the cameras used onsite were tested on reference objects under controlled pool conditions. The results...

  • Action, Compromise, and Transformation: Mortuary Genealogies and Social Change in the Virgin Islands and Barbados (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Helen Blouet.

    This paper interprets documentary data, material remains, and landscape histories for St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands (formerly part of the Danish West Indies) and Barbados (part of the British Commonwealth) to examine how Caribbean Moravian congregations enacted, compromised, and transformed burial and commemorative practices through social and spiritual interactions. I identify historical variation in burial site materiality and spatiality to understand how burial grounds reflected and informed...

  • An Adaptive Legacy: Repurposing Lighthouses from Navigational Aids to Heritage Tourism Destinations in North Carolina (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Lauren M Christian.

    The lighthouses of North Carolina were originally constructed to aid navigation through treacherous waterways, but the advancement of modern navigational equipment has diminished their necessity for that purpose. In 2000, the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act was enacted to see to the transference of federally owned historic light stations to qualified new stewards. Today, the National Parks Service, private organizations, and community associations manage the lighthouses on the...

  • Adding and Subtracting: Manipulating Ceramic Manufacture to Signal Cultural Identity Among Indigenous Populations of the San Antonio Missions (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Steve A. Tomka.

    The analysis of ceramic assemblages was a corner stone of Dr. Gilmore's approach to Spanish Colonial Studies.  Following this tradition, the presentation uses the results of pertrographic analyses of native-made ceramics assemblages from several of the South Texas and coastal plains missions to track the manipulation of manufacture techniques among ethinically distinct indigenous groups.  The combination of microscopic ceramic fabric characteristics with macroscopic decorative approaches suggest...

  • Adding Lasers to the Archaeological Toolkit: The Costs and Benefits of Terrestrial LiDAR in Digital Archaeology (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Patricia G Markert. Benjamin Skolnik. Stefan F. Woehlke.

    In recent years, companies such as FARO and CyArk have begun incorporating 3D laser scanners into field-ready packages.  Archaeologists have successfully employed these new 3D laser-scanning techniques to record sites such as Mount Rushmore and Merv in modern-day Turkmenistan.  Despite the potential benefits of using this technology, which produces quickly scanned, high-resolution images of topography and features, several limitations have slowed it from entering the archaeologist’s standard...

  • Additional Slave Settlements at Cannon’s Point Plantation (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Nicholas Honerkamp. Lindsey Cochran.

    This is an abstract from the "Archaeologies of Enslavement" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Thanks to a recent clear cutting approach to eliminating stands of pine-beetle-infested trees at Cannon’s Point Plantation, St. Simons Island, Georgia, an additional slave cabin settlement has been identified. A systematic survey was carried out at the site by the University of Tennessee during the summer of 2018, resulting in the recovery of domestic...

  • Addressing Neglected Narratives Through The Maritime Cultural Landscape Of Point Pearce Aboriginal Mission/Burgiyana, South Australia (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Maddy E Fowler.

    This paper presents results of research based upon an oral history, archaeological and archival case study of the maritime activities at Point Pearce Aboriginal Mission/Burgiyana in South Australia—the traditional land of the Narungga people. Point Pearce was established in 1868 and has been self-managed by the community since 1966, forming the historical time period for this study; however the research also draws on pre-contact knowledges. This case study was used to assess whether the maritime...

  • Admiring the Hush Arbor: Confronting Slavery in the American South (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael B Thomin. Tristan J Harrenstein.

    This is an abstract from the "The Public and Our Communities: How to Present Engaging Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In March 2017, the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) North Central regional office created a new public program called "Admiring the Hush Arbor." A hush arbor was a meeting place, usually secret, that took place outdoors where enslaved African-Americans practiced religious traditions and served as a framework...

  • aDNA in Historical Archaeology As A Tool For The Mitigation Of Climate Change Hazards (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only George Hambrecht.

    The study of aDNA has become a highly productive avenue of study in Archaeolgoy, though perhaps less so in Historical Archaeology. This paper discusses a project in which aDNA from historic sites is being used to address many important issues typically approached by Historical Archaeology. Yet this project goes further in two specific ways.  First this project intends to map and when possible isolate genetic variation that has been lost in modern day domesitc animals but that can still be found...

  • The Adriatic Sea – Underwater Archaeology in Croatia (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jurica Bezak. Igor Miholjek.

    As the leading team in Croatian underwater archaeology, the Department for Underwater Archaeology of the Croatian Conservation Institute carries out systematic and protective research on underwater archaeological sites along the Croatian coastline of the Adriatic Sea. The Department's field of work covers a large time span and encompasses prehistory, classical antiquity, the Byzantine period, medieval and post-Mediaeval shipwrecks dating from the 11th to the 18th centuries, and wrecks from World...

  • Advanced Digital Modelling of the Newport Medieval Ship (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Toby N. Jones. Nigel Nayling. Pat Tanner.

    Since its discovery in 2002, the remains of the mid 15th century clinker built Newport Medieval Ship have been excavated, cleaned, documented, modelled and are now midway through PEG and freeze-drying conservation treatment. Digital documentation methods, including laser scanning and contact digitising were used extensively. The manufacture and assembly of a 1:10 scale physical model of the vessel remains has provided both construction sequence information and a suitable foundation from which to...

  • Advances In Laboratory and Field Use Of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (pXRF) and LASAR ABLATION-ICPMS (LA-ICP-MS) Technologies In Field Archaeological And Combined Survey Format (CSF) Surveys (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Richard J Lundin.

    Major advances in the Laboratory and Field Use of Portable X-Rarchaeologyay Fluorescence (pXRF) and the newly developed LASAR ABLATION ICP-MS (ICP-MS) in archaeology are enabling investigators to gain new insights into the elemental and chemical content of laboratory and field samples of artifact, soil and plant materials.  Many of these advances have come directly from laboratory studies and field geochemical investigations initiatiated by mineral industry and governmental organizations and...

  • Advancing interpretation of USS Monitor through digital reconstruction (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Hannah E. Piner.

    It can be difficult to interact with a large artifact actively undergoing conservation treatment and desalination. The artifact is almost constantly submerged in a treatment bath making it impossible or impractical for the archaeologist to study the particularities and imperfections of the object. This can postpone significant archaeological interpretation for years. By digitally reconstructing USS Monitor’s iconic gun turret, using photogrammetry and laser scanning, USS Monitor Center staff at...

  • Advancing The Study Of Cultural Frontiers In Post-Medieval Ireland – Native Innovation In The Face Of Colonial Power (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Paul J Logue.

    Historical archaeology in the north of Ireland offers much to the global debate on identity and cultural interaction. There, social order in the post-medieval period has been portrayed as representing a culturally isolated conservative society: a point of contrast with ‘civilised’ Europe. North Irish elites are traditionally believed to have used earth and timber indigenous sites as alternatives to a supposedly more mainstream European architectural lexicon. Recent studies challenge this...

  • The Advice You Were Looking For: The ACUA Mentorship Program Panel Discussion (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Keilani Hernandez.

    This is an abstract from the "The Advice You Were Looking For: The ACUA Mentorship Program Panel Discussion" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Beginning January 2018, at the previous Society for Historical Archaeology Conference in New Orleans, LA, the Advisory Council of Underwater Archaeology organization debuted the Mentorship Program consisting of leading professionals in underwater archaeology careers. Once debuted, there was an overwhelming...

  • An Aerial Micro-Topographical Landscape Survey on Montserrat, West Indies (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew F. Pihokker. John F. Cherry. Krysta Ryzewski.

    During the 2016 field season, the Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat (SLAM) project undertook an intensive micro-landscape survey of targeted areas within the northern and north-central regions of Montserrat. A mountainous, volcanic island of the Lesser Antilles situated within the southeastern Caribbean, pedestrian survey on Montserrat presents a particularly challenging set of logistical difficulties and calls for alternative strategies of data acquisition, especially the use of...

  • "Africa" in Connecticut (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Croucher.

    In this paper I discuss how archaeological interpretations of nineteenth century free black communities can be strengthened when Africa as a discursive concept is included alongside our analyses of race. In the southern U.S. historical archaeologists have long been attuned to the tangible material presence of enslaved Africans and their descendants. I address the question of "Africa" in relation to nineteenth century free communities of color in Connecticut, arguing that the discursive nature of...

  • African American Burials and Memorials in Colonial Williamsburg (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Ywone Edwards-Ingram.

    This paper discusses archaeological findings within Colonial Williamsburg and explores factors that have influenced ways of knowing about eighteenth-century burial sites of African-descendant individuals and groups in Williamsburg, Virginia.  While the emphasis is on the colonial era, some attention is given to the nineteenth century and the more visible commemorations of the dead relating to this period.   The aim is to discuss burials and commemorative practices of enslaved and free blacks and...

  • The African American Cemetery at Catoctin Furnace: Bridging the Past and the Future (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jane I. Seiter.

    The Catoctin African American Cemetery is the resting place of at least 50 individuals who labored at Catoctin Furnace and its surrounding community from the 1770s to the 1840s. Many of these men and women were enslaved workers, while others were possibly part of the free black population that also lived and worked at the furnace. In 2014, an ambitious project to preserve, protect, and interpret the cemetery was launched. Documentary research, forensic analysis, and geophysical investigations...

  • African American Diaspora Archaeology and the National Park Service: Reflections on the Past and Goals for the Future (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Meredith Hardy. David Morgan.

    For 50 years archeologists from the National Park Service’s Southeast Archeological Center have actively worked to uncover, preserve, and interpret African American archeological heritage in our National Parks. SEAC’s work has spanned from the Stafford slave village at Cumberland Island National Seashore to the William Johnson House in Natchez, Mississippi, from the lands owned by a free woman creole of color in Natchitoches, Louisiana to the waters off the cays and harbors in St. Croix, U.S....

  • African American Life in Central Delaware, 1770-1940: Archaeology Combined with Documentary Research (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Heidi Krofft. Jason Shellenhamer.

    The historic farm site of Samuel Dale, an AME minister and leader in the African American community around Middletown, Delaware, was identified and evaluated for the U.S. Route 301 project.  The site was determined eligible, however, it was decided that a traditional data-recovery would not yield the greatest mitigation benefit.  Instead, a historic context detailing the African-American community in St. Georges Hundred from 1770-1940 was prepared to mitigate the impacts to the site.  The...

  • African Americans and NAGPRA: The Call for an African American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Justin Dunnavant.

    Increasing urbanization and gentrification have led to the rapid development of some of America's largest cities. As urban space becomes more scarce, African American heritage sites face increasing threats from developers and city planners alike. In light the 50th anniversary of the National Heritage Preservation Act and more than 25 years after the passage of NAGPRA, this paper highlights the disparities and challenges associated with preserving African American heritage sites in the USA....

  • African Americans in a Dominican Cemetery: Social Boundaries of an Enclave Community (2013)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kristen R. Fellows.

    This paper presents preliminary findings from an aboveground study of a cemetery in Samaná, Dominican Republic. In 1824 approximately 200 African Americans left the United States for what was then Haiti, and established an enclave in a relatively isolated area of the island. Their Anglo surnames, Protestantism, and primary use of English have defined this community in relation to the neighboring Dominican and Haitian populations for over 150 years. Using spatial data from the town’s cemetery, I...

  • African Americans, Resistance, and the Spiritual Alteration of the Physical Environment on the Levi Jordan Plantation, Brazoria County, Tx (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Tara Ruttley. Cynthia Ericson. Kenneth Brown.

    In 1986, the University of Houston began conducting archaeological excavations at the Levi-Jordan Plantation in Brazoria County, Tx in an effort to recover contextual material that would reveal information about the enslaved community, sharecroppers, and tenants who lived at the plantation. Established in 1848, the plantation was home to nearly 150 slaves at its pre-civil war peak, and was a major producer of both sugar and cotton. Early excavations of the curer’s cabin and church revealed...

  • African Diaspora Archaeology "The Bocas Way" (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jerry Howard.

    This research is an investigation into the African Diaspora and an archaeological approach that is based on exploring the African Diaspora in a complex, multi-ethnic, multiracial situation, where I was able to draw on excavations, archival documents, and ethnography to infer the process of culture change and emergent identities. The research takes place within the western Caribbean island community of Bocas del Toro, Panama. In this presentation I will present my perspectives and approach to...

  • The African Diaspora in West Africa: The Atlantic Slave Trade and Colonial Eras on the Gambia River (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Liza Gijanto.

    The Gambia River was an active site of the Atlantic slave trade and British efforts to legitimize trade in the 19th century.  African peoples were brought from the Gold Coast and Sierra Leone as part of different commercial and colonial ventures while others were sent to the Americas as enslaved. Geographically part of the African Diaspora as both a site of departure and settlement, this paper explores African populations resettled along the river as slaves and liberated Africans in the 18th and...

  • African Mortuary Dreams in Alabama: A First Look at the Old Plateau/Africatown Cemetery Burial Patterns (2019)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Neil Norman.

    This is an abstract from the "Cemeteries and Burial Practices" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. The last slaver to make the TransAtlantic Crossing did so in 1860.  Those who survived the passage built a community at Africatown, just northeast of Mobile Alabama.  At Africatown, they mixed African and European elements in their daily practices and material culture.  This paper explores burial patterns at the Africatown/Old Plateau Cemetery. It...

  • African Slave Spells and Root Work: Crossing the Boundary of Past to Present in Contemporary Cemeteries (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sharon K. Moses.

    Recurring evidence of "root work" or "hoodoo" and other African magic rituals have been found periodically in and around the graves of the recently dead in contemporary cemeteries located in the South. This paper is an exploration of the connection between the author’s excavation site, a slave street on a former rice plantation located in the South Carolina Low Country, and descendants that maintain conjuring traditions and practices. Slaves used "root work" and rituals for health curatives, to...

  • African-American In-Ground Vaults: An Investigation Into Differential Burial Practices Identified Through A Public Archaeology Initiative (2016)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kevin A Gidusko. Patrisha L. Meyers.

    Historic cemeteries are some of the most threatened cultural resources in the state of Florida; of these, historic African-American cemeteries are most at risk. Subject to neglect, rapid urbanization, and the loss of community remembrance, these sites are in need of immediate preservation efforts. This paper discusses investigations into these sites through the work of the Florida Historic Cemeteries Recording Project (FLHCRP), a volunteer-driven effort overseen by the Florida Public Archaeology...

  • Africans were not alone. A view over African experience and expression in relation to other ‘subaltern’ groups (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Camilla Agostini.

    During the illegal slave trade period, thousands of Africans arrived in Brazil. A coastal community in this period, where free, poor and white-mestizo (branco e pardo) group of pottery makers lived side by side with Africans and their descendants, will be the subject of this presentation. From the archaeological perspective, locally made pottery in these contexts is frequently seen by Brazilian researchers as having African influence. They can, however, be observed in another perspective, with...

  • Afro-Brazilian Spaces of Worship: Late Nineteenth Century Archaeological Findings from Salvador, Bahia (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel L. Gordenstein.

    This paper discusses the transformation of domestic living quarters into spaces of Afro-religious worship in Salvador, Brazil, during the late nineteenth century. This is accomplished through the presentation of historical sources that demonstrate the pervasiveness of this phenomenon, and especially, analysis of spatial and artifactual data unearthed during archaeological excavations in a house basement. The study uses historical, ethnohistorical and ethnographic analogies with present day...

  • Afrodescendientes en el Ferrocarril del Norte: Memorias y Materialidad de Pueblos Fantasmas del Valle del Mira (Carchi - Ecuador) (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Ana María Morales.

    La historia oficial ecuatoriana desconoce el rol de Afrodescendientes del Valle del Mira (Carchi) en la construcción del Ferrocarril del Norte y su impacto en estas. Este proyecto fue parte de la agenda progresista que surge en el S XVIII, del cual el Ferrocarril del Norte fue elltimo tramo que se construyó (1957) y funcionó hasta la década de los 90. Unió Ibarra con San Lorenzo, transformando los poblados del trayecto que emergieron con las vías férreas pero que luego se vieron abandonados,...

  • After the Gear is Gone: Perspectives from the Digital Index of North American Archaeology on How Archaeologists Implement Digital Instances of Past Peoples and Scientific Concepts (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kelsey Noack Myers. Robert DeMuth. Joshua J Wells. David Anderson. Eric Kansa. Stephen Yerka. Sarah W. Kansa. Alex Badillo. Molly Mesner.

    Archaeologists today engage with digital records of primary data, derivative interpretive information, and ontological descriptors used to represent intellectual models of individual research, and instantiations of theoretical constructs from the local to the landscape. Prior to and into the digital age, the archaeological record writ large as a testable and defensible set of hypotheses and factual statements is constructed from a melange of meaningful information expected to correlate with...

  • After the Railroad: An examination of Chinese in Sandpoint, Idaho (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Molly Swords. Mark Warner. Margaret Clark.

    Like other western American railroad towns, Sandpoint, Idaho, saw an influx of thousands of Chinese workers during railroad construction in the twilight of the 1800s. Most workers moved on as construction of the railroad continued down the line. Examination of a Chinese laundry excavation provides an interesting snapshot of the lives those workers who stayed and made Sandpoint their home. This business was also a residence and the collection provides an opportunity to study both the private and...

  • After They Drove Old Dixie Down: Identity and Isolation in a Southwestern Oregon Mountain Refuge (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Chelsea Rose. Mark Tveskov.

    In the spring of 1872 the ‘Carolina Company’ wagon train left the war-torn Appalachian Mountains and headed to Oregon. Pulling up generations’ worth of roots in a region particularly devastated by the infamous Stoneman’s Raid of 1865, the group eventually found refuge on a remote mountain on the Southwest Oregon Coast, where they were given three years to ‘starve out’ by neighboring communities. Described as ‘the bone and sinew’ of the south, the Carolina Company soon established a mill, school,...

  • Afterlives of Slavery on the Post-Emancipation Caribbean Plantation (2017)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Reilly. Genevieve Godbout.

    This paper offers some opening remarks that introduce the conceptual framework informing this session. A rich body of archaeological literature has investigated plantation slavery in the Caribbean region, but far less attention has been paid to the post-emancipation landscape and the significant transformations that affected the lives of laborers. We seek to address how a focus on the post-emancipation Caribbean plantation landscape can provide unique insights into how notions of freedom were...

  • Against All Odds: The British Siege and the Spanish Defense of Cartagena in 1741 and the Interpretation of Spanish Shipwrecks (2014)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Juan G. Martin. Frederick Hanselmann. Christopher Horrell. Jose Espinosa.

    In 1741, British Admiral Edwin Vernon attempted to sack the Spanish colonial town of Cartagena de Indias. Though outmanned and under-gunned, the fragile defensive network established by Blas de Lezo held, thwarting the English attempts. This defensive network is now one aspect of the larger Sunken Ships of Cartagena Project. In 2012 and 2013, marine archaeologists and researchers from the Universidad del Norte en Barranquilla, Texas State University, volunteers from federal institutions, the...